NOAA Big Data Project

Amazon Web Services has entered into a research agreement with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to explore sustainable models to increase the output of open NOAA data. Publicly available NOAA data drives multi-billion dollar industries and critical research efforts. Under this agreement, AWS and its collaborators will look at ways to push more NOAA data to the cloud and build an ecosystem of innovation around it.


Search datasets (currently 13 matching datasets)


Add to this registry

If you want to add a dataset or example of how to use a dataset to this registry, please follow the instructions on the Registry of Open Data on AWS GitHub repository.

Unless specifically stated in the applicable dataset documentation, datasets available through the Registry of Open Data on AWS are not provided and maintained by AWS. Datasets are provided and maintained by a variety of third parties under a variety of licenses. Please check dataset licenses and related documentation to determine if a dataset may be used for your application.

NEXRAD on AWS

earth observationmeteorologicalnatural resourcesustainabilityweather

Real-time and archival data from the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) network.

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GOES on AWS

disaster responseearth observationgeospatialmeteorologicalsatellite imagerysustainabilityweather

GOES satellites (GOES-16 & GOES-17) provide continuous weather imagery and monitoring of meteorological and space environment data across North America. GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They hover continuously over one position on the surface. The satellites orbit high enough to allow for a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric "triggers" for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hailstorms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements.

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NOAA Global Historical Climatology Network Daily (GHCN-D)

climatemeteorologicalsustainabilityweather

Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily is a dataset from NOAA that contains daily observations over global land areas. It contains station-based measurements from land-based stations worldwide, about two thirds of which are for precipitation measurement only. Other meteorological elements include, but are not limited to, daily maximum and minimum temperature, temperature at the time of observation, snowfall and snow depth. It is a composite of climate records from numerous sources that were merged together and subjected to a common suite of quality assurance reviews. Some data are more than 175 years old. The data is in CSV format. Each file corresponds to a year from 1763 to present and is named as such.

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NOAA Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS)

climatemeteorologicalsustainabilityweather

The Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS), previously known as the GFS Global ENSemble (GENS), is a weather forecast model made up of 21 separate forecasts, or ensemble members. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) started the GEFS to address the nature of uncertainty in weather observations, which is used to initialize weather forecast models. The GEFS attempts to quantify the amount of uncertainty in a forecast by generating an ensemble of multiple forecasts, each minutely different, or perturbed, from the original observations. With global coverage, GEFS is produced four times a day with weather forecasts going out to 16 days.

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NOAA Global Forecast System (GFS)

climatedisaster responseenvironmentalmeteorologicalsustainabilityweather

The Global Forecast System (GFS) is a weather forecast model produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Dozens of atmospheric and land-soil variables are available through this dataset, from temperatures, winds, and precipitation to soil moisture and atmospheric ozone concentration. The entire globe is covered by the GFS at a base horizontal resolution of 18 miles (28 kilometers) between grid points, which is used by the operational forecasters who predict weather out to 16 days in the future. Horizontal resolution drops to 44 miles (70 kilometers) between grid point for forecasts between one week and two weeks. Both the current version and the FV3-based parallel version of the GFS being tested to become the new operational model at a future date are available.

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NOAA Global Historical Climatology Network Hourly (GHCN-H)

climatemeteorologicalsustainabilityweather

Global Historical Climatology Network - Hourly is a dataset from NOAA that contains daily observations over global land areas. It contains station-based measurements from land-based stations worldwide, about two thirds of which are for precipitation measurement only. Other meteorological elements include, but are not limited to, daily maximum and minimum temperature, temperature at the time of observation, snowfall and snow depth. It is a composite of climate records from numerous sources that were merged together and subjected to a common suite of quality assurance reviews. Some data are more than 175 years old. The data is in CSV format. Each file corresponds to a year from 1763 to present and is named as such.

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NOAA Global Hydro Estimator (GHE)

meteorologicalsustainabilitywaterweather

Global Hydro-Estimator provides a global mosaic imagery of rainfall estimates from multi-geostationary satellites, which currently includes GOES-16, GOES-15, Meteosat-8, Meteosat-11 and Himawari-8. The GHE products include: Instantaneous rain rate, 1 hour, 3 hour, 6 hour, 24 hour and also multi-day rainfall accumulation.

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NOAA High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Model

climatedisaster responseenvironmentalsustainabilityweather

The HRRR is a NOAA real-time 3-km resolution, hourly updated, cloud-resolving, convection-allowing atmospheric model, initialized by 3km grids with 3km radar assimilation. Radar data is assimilated in the HRRR every 15 min over a 1-h period adding further detail to that provided by the hourly data assimilation from the 13km radar-enhanced Rapid Refresh.

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NOAA Integrated Surface Database (ISD)

climatemeteorologicalsustainabilityweather

The Integrated Surface Database (ISD) consists of global hourly and synoptic observations compiled from numerous sources into a gzipped fixed width format. ISD was developed as a joint activity within Asheville's Federal Climate Complex. The database includes over 35,000 stations worldwide, with some having data as far back as 1901, though the data show a substantial increase in volume in the 1940s and again in the early 1970s. Currently, there are over 14,000 "active" stations updated daily in the database. The total uncompressed data volume is around 600 gigabytes; however, it continues to grow as more data are added. ISD includes numerous parameters such as wind speed and direction, wind gust, temperature, dew point, cloud data, sea level pressure, altimeter setting, station pressure, present weather, visibility, precipitation amounts for various time periods, snow depth, and various other elements as observed by each station.

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NOAA National Water Model Reanalysis

agricultureclimatedisaster responseenvironmentalsustainabilitytransportationweather

The NOAA National Water Model Reanalysis dataset contains output from multi-decade retrospective simulations. These simulations used observed rainfall as input and ingested other required meteorological input fields from a weather reanalysis dataset. The output frequency and fields available in this historical NWM dataset differ from those contained in the real-time forecast model. One application of this dataset is to provide historical context to current real-time streamflow, soil moisture and snowpack NWM conditions. The reanalysis data can be used to infer flow frequencies and perform temporal analyses with hourly streamflow output and 3-hourly land surface output. The long-term dataset can also be used in the development of end user applications which require a long baseline of data for system training or verification purposes. This dataset contains output from two retrospective simulations. Currently there are two versions of the dataset: A 25-year (January 1993 through December 2017) retrospective simulation using version 1.2 of the National Water Model, and a 26-year (January 1993 through December 2018) retrospective simulation using version 2.0 of the National Water Model.

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NOAA National Water Model Short-Range Forecast

agricultureclimatedisaster responseenvironmentalsustainabilitytransportationweather

The National Water Model (NWM) is a water resources model that simulates and forecasts water budget variables, including snowpack, evapotranspiration, soil moisture and streamflow, over the entire continental United States (CONUS). The model, launched in August 2016, is designed to improve the ability of NOAA to meet the needs of its stakeholders (forecasters, emergency managers, reservoir operators, first responders, recreationists, farmers, barge operators, and ecosystem and floodplain managers) by providing expanded accuracy, detail, and frequency of water information. It is operated by NOAA’s Office of Water Prediction. This bucket contains a four-week rollover of the Short Range Forecast model output and the corresponding forcing data for the model. The model is forced with meteorological data from the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) and the Rapid Refresh (RAP) models. The Short Range Forecast configuration cycles hourly and produces hourly deterministic forecasts of streamflow and hydrologic states out to 18 hours.

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NOAA Operational Forecast System (OFS)

climatecoastaldisaster responseenvironmentalmeteorologicaloceanssustainabilitywaterweather

The Operational Forecast System (OFS) has been developed to serve the maritime user community. OFS was developed in a joint project of the NOAA/National Ocean Service (NOS)/Office of Coast Survey, the NOAA/NOS/Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS), and the NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS)/National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Central Operations (NCO). OFS generates water level, water current, water temperature, water salinity (except for the Great Lakes) and wind conditions nowcast and forecast guidance four times per day.

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